Using Google Drive to Track Client Behaviors

9 May

I came across an article at Lifehacker recently that included a downloadable Google Drive form billed as a “Daily Personal Inventory.” The article, titled “Fill Out This One-Minute Form Every Day and Find Out Why Your Life Sucks (Or Doesn’t),” got me thinking about the countless ways Google Drive could be used to track client mood, eating patterns, self-care, or other behaviors related to therapeutic goals. Because spreadsheets on Google Drive can be shared and mutually edited, I could increase accountability by periodically checking client progress and leaving comments in a designated column. Client data could also be graphed for a quick visual assessment of progress, and it could ultimately be used as a rough measure of therapist effectiveness. Google Drive documents could even be shared with psychiatrists or other health professionals involved with a client to increase integration of care.

I’ve been playing around with a simple mood-tracking spreadsheet format, and I may try creating tracking documents for other behaviors. Although confidentiality could be an issue – Google’s confidentiality policy is relatively solid, but not water-tight by any means – clients could be informed of the risks and benefits and given the opportunity to sign a consent form prior to data tracking.

Have any of you ever used Google Drive as a therapeutic aid?

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: